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Agenda

16 November

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The first day combines plenary keynote speeches with 20 hands-on workshops: 15 Workstream sessions bringing together officials from a handful of related professions or functions, and five Cross-Disciplinary workshops addressing topics relevant to all kinds of professionals.

The Workstream sessions will consider the participants’ roles in relevant aspects of civil service innovation – examining how to maximise their contribution on this front; what cross-government changes are required to promote progress; and how they can best support other professions and functions working on the same agenda.

The professions covered by each Workstream are set out at the head of the columns below. Following those columns down, you’ll see which aspects of innovation each Workstream will be exploring. During the day, five key topics will each be examined in three workshops. These five topics are: Leading Innovation; Data Management and Sharing; Commissioning and Deploying New Technologies; Skills and Tools; and Programme Governance and Finance. 

While Workstream sessions are likely to be of most value to people working within the listed professions, you are free to join any you choose; even if your profession isn’t named in any of the Workstreams, we think you’ll find plenty of sessions to interest you. Where no session is listed in a timeslot for your chosen Workstream, you can register for another workshop that interests you – or simply join colleagues for a coffee in our networking area. 

Five of the six workshops during the 15.30-16.50 slot are cross-disciplinary; in these cases, please simply pick the one that interests you most. 

Conducted under the Chatham House rule, workshops will be chaired by leading specialists and senior officials. Drawn from relevant disciplines and programmes – both in the UK and overseas – the chairs may present to the group on their own experiences, before facilitating a wider debate and teasing out conclusions. These conclusions are then fed into following day’s panel debates: for details of these, scroll down to the 17 November agenda.

All times quoted are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

08:30 – 09:30 (GMT)

Welcome address and keynote on the UK civil service modernisation and reform programme followed by audience Q&A

Keynote by
  • Alex Chisholm, Chief Operating Officer, UK Civil Service and Permanent Secretary, Cabinet Office, United Kingdom. Followed by a welcome from Julie Teigland, EY EMEIA Area Managing Partner and EY Global Leader – Women. Fast forward
    Chaired by
    • Siobhan Benita, Global Government Forum, former UK civil servant


Workstreams

Related professions or functions
Workstream A for professions related to

Policy, Operational Delivery, and Research

Workstream B for professions related to

Digital, Data & Technology, Knowledge & Information Management, and Statistics

Workstream C for professions related to

Finance, Tax, and Fraud, Error & Debt

Workstream D for professions related to

Programme & Project Management

Workstream E for professions related to

Commercial & Procurement

Workstream F for professions related to

Workforce, Workplace and Property

09:30 – 10:50 (GMT)

Workstream B

Data Management and Sharing (Workshop 5)


How to develop the systems, protocols and regulatory structures required to support secure, effective use of data across government – both on the technical front, and in terms of building public trust in departments’ use of citizen’s personal data.

Chaired by
  • Eileen Fuchs, Principle and Head of Division; Digital policy, Federal Ministry of the Interior, Germany
Workstream C

Data Management and Sharing (Workshop 6)


How to develop the systems, protocols and regulatory structures required to support secure, effective use of data across government – both on the technical front, and in terms of building public trust in departments’ use of citizen’s personal data.

Chaired by
  • Mireille Laroche, Assistant Commissioner, Service, Innovation and Integration Branch, Chief Data Officer, and Chief Service Officer, Canada
Workstream D

Leading Innovation (Workshop 11)


At a time of digital disruption, many governments and public agencies are launching performance improvement and transformational programmes. In many ways, PPM leaders and specialists stand at the innovation frontline as business owners and professions come together to transform at scale and reinvent current structures, processes and ways of working – often digitally. In this workshop participants will consider what it takes to lead, to innovate, and to succeed in delivering business transformation.

Chaired by
  • Arnauld Bertrand, EY Global GPS Consulting Leader
  • Seong Ju Park, Deputy Director of the Digital Government Cooperation Division, Republic of Korea
  • Catherine Friday, Managing Partner, EY Oceania Government and Health Sciences
  • Raju Varnasi, CIO at Catholic Education in the Diocese of Parramatta, Australia
Workstream E

Commissioning and Deploying New Technologies (Workshop 12)


How civil services can adapt systems, processes and cultures to suit the strengths, demands and risks of digital technologies, and the particular challenges around procurement and delivery of emerging technologies.

Chaired by
  • Melinda Johnson, Commercial Director, Department of Health & Social Care, UK
Workstream F

Skills and Tools (Workshop 14)


The capabilities, specialist skills, systems, policies and working methods required to create a more innovative civil service – considering how these can be developed, how the participating professions can hasten progress, and the support required from other functions and the centre of government.

Chaired by
  • Lee May Gee, Director, Public Sector Transformation Cluster, Public Service Division, Prime Minister’s Office, Singapore

10:50 – 11:20 (GMT)

Coffee Break and Networking

11:20 – 12:40 (GMT)

Workstream B

Skills and Tools (Workshop 2)


The capabilities, specialist skills, systems, policies and working methods required to create a more innovative civil service – considering how these can be developed, how the participating professions can hasten progress, and the support required from other functions and the centre of government.

Chaired by
  • Fiona Deans, Acting Director General, Government Digital Service, UK
Workstream C

Commissioning and Deploying New Technologies (Workshop 7)


How civil services can adapt systems, processes and cultures to suit the strengths, demands and risks of digital technologies, and the particular challenges around procurement and delivery of emerging technologies.

Chaired by
  • Hans-Jörg Schäper, Deputy Director General, Directorate General VI - Information Technology, Federal Ministry of Finance, Germany
Workstream D

Programme Governance and Finance (Workshop 9)


Innovative projects often demand new forms of governance and finance: for example, to reconcile systems of budgeting and departmental accountability with the needs of cross-departmental services and digital, Agile project management. This workshop will consider how governance and finance processes can best support innovation.

Chaired by
  • Vesa Lipponen, Chief Information Officer, Ministry of Finance, Finland

Workstream E

Programme Governance and Finance (Workshop 13)


Innovative projects often demand new forms of governance and finance: for example, to reconcile systems of budgeting and departmental accountability with the needs of cross-departmental services and digital, Agile project management. This workshop will consider how governance and finance processes can best support innovation.

Chaired by
  • Matthew Rees, Director of Regulation and Economics, Single Source Regulations Office, UK
Workstream F

Leading Innovation (Workshop 15)


Strengthening innovation demands visionary, collaborative leadership, changes to systems of recruitment, performance management and promotion, and a new approach to risk management. This workshop will consider the changes required to civil service leadership in order to promote and support innovation.

Chaired by
  • Josie Cluer, EY Partner, People Advisory Services, Government and Public Sector, United Kingdom
  • Magnus Enzell, Senior Advisor, Department for Digital Government, Ministry of Infrastructure, Sweden
  • Pamela Dow, Executive Director, Government Skills for Learning, United Kingdom
  • Michelle Campbell, Executive Director, Office of Projects Victoria, Australia
  • Laura Mahoney, Head Public Sector Reform in the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform in Ireland
  • Deepti Srivastava, Director, Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship, Government of India

12:40 – 13:40 (GMT)

Lunch and Networking

13:40 to 15:00 (GMT)

Workstream A

Leading Innovation (Workshop 1)


Strengthening innovation demands visionary, collaborative leadership, changes to systems of recruitment, performance management and promotion, and a new approach to risk management. This workshop will consider the changes required to civil service leadership in order to promote and support innovation.

Chaired by
  • Oliver Jones, EY-Parthenon Global Government and Public Sector Strategy Leader; Partner, Geostrategic Business Group
  • Gaurav Taneja, EY India, Government & Public Sector Leader
Workstream B

Commissioning and Deploying New Technologies (Workshop 3)


How civil services can adapt systems, processes and cultures to suit the strengths, demands and risks of digital technologies, and the particular challenges around procurement and delivery of emerging technologies.

Chaired by
  • Stefan Schlosser, Policy Advisor, Federal Chancellery, Division Digital State, Germany
Workstream C

Programme Governance and Finance (Workshop 8)


Innovative projects often demand new forms of governance and finance: for example, to reconcile systems of budgeting and departmental accountability with the needs of cross-departmental services and digital, Agile project management. This workshop will consider how governance and finance processes can best support innovation.

Chaired by
  • Paul O'Neil, Deputy Chief Executive of Operations and General Counsel, Serious Fraud Office, New Zealand

Workstream D

Skills and Tools (Workshop 10)


The capabilities, specialist skills, systems, policies and working methods required to create a more innovative civil service – considering how these can be developed, how the participating professions can hasten progress, and the support required from other functions and the centre of government.

Chaired by
  • Hala Audi, Director of Strategy, Performance & Assurance, Infrastructure and Projects Authority, United Kingdom

15:00 – 15:30 (GMT)

Coffee Break and Networking

15:30 – 16:50 (GMT)

Cross-disciplinary Workshops

Workshops 16-20 will consider some of the cross-cutting issues around innovation, bringing together officials from a wide range of professions and functions.
Workstream A

Data Management and Sharing (Workshop 4)


How to develop the systems, protocols and regulatory structures required to support secure, effective use of data across government – both on the technical front, and in terms of building public trust in departments’ use of citizen’s personal data.

Chaired by
  • Oliver Jones, EY-Parthenon Global Government and Public Sector Strategy Leader; Partner, Geostrategic Business Group
  • Shahar Bracha, Acting CEO, Government ICT Authority, The National Digital Ministry, Israel
  • Marcelo Kekligian, EY MENA, Chief Innovation Officer and Digital Leader
  • Nicole Wang, Policy Advisor (on secondment) at Department for Transport | Director, Economic Advisory at EY
  • Basem Aljedai, CEO for Government Innovation, Ministry of Communications & Information Technology, Saudi Arabia

Recruitment, retention and training for an innovative workforce (Workshop 16)


To support innovation, every profession and function will have to reshape its approach to hiring, developing and promoting staff. Participants will discuss how HR and functional leaders can best create a workforce with the talent, ideas and ambition to drive transformation. This workshop will feed into the Skills and Tools panel debate.

Chaired by
  • Raj Thuppal, Chief Technology Officer, Shared Services Canada, Canada

Building public confidence and consent for data sharing (Workshop 17)


Data sharing is often central to creating more accessible, efficient and effective services – but in many countries, public suspicion puts the brake on civil servants’ ambitions. This workshop will consider how various countries manage data transparency, control and permissions, and explore how governments can promote public confidence. This workshop will feed into the Data Management and Sharing panel debate.

Chaired by
  • Julie Pierce, Director of Openness, Data and Digital and Director for Wales, Food Standards Agency, United Kingdom

The next generation of digital technologies (Workshop 18)


As civil servants develop their use of technologies such as Cloud, ‘Government as a Platform’ and Robotic Process Automation, the next wave of digital systems are on their way – most notably Artificial Intelligence (AI). This workshop will review the current wave of new tech, considering both their potential and the demands they place on civil servants. This workshop will feed into the panel debate on Commissioning and Deploying New Technologies.

Chaired by
  • Chris Ferguson, Director, Government Digital Service, United Kingdom

Governance for cross-departmental programmes (Workshop 19)


In a world of vertical accountabilities, programmes that demand horizontal collaboration are often in tension with systems of project approval, management and governance. Participants will consider the reforms necessary to support better partnership working and shared service delivery across government. This workshop will feed into the panel debate on Programme Governance and Finance.
Chaired by
  • Kevin Cunnington, Director General of International Government Service, United Kingdom

Staff engagement, communications and change management (Workshop 20)


No matter how brilliant an idea, it will only be delivered successfully if staff are effectively engaged in its development and implementation. This workshop will explore approaches to change communications – and consider how the process of securing workforce buy-in could itself be improved. This workshop will feed into the Leading Innovation panel debate.

Chaired by
  • Susan Acland-Hood, Acting Permanent Secretary at the Department for Education, United Kingdom

17 November

Comprising a series of plenaries, Day Two will include short presentations on innovation delivered by leading civil servants from the UK and abroad; a series of panel debates on key topics in innovation; and a number of break-out Special Sessions.

The panel debates will bring together the chairs of Day One’s workshops, along with other relevant figures. Speakers will feed in the key findings of their workshops, before exploring – both in a chaired debate, and in response to questions and comments from the audience – how civil servants from all disciplines and departments can best promote innovation in the field.

The Special Sessions cover particular topics within innovation, such as sustainable cities and risk management within the supply chain. Further details are available within the booking system.

The day will close with a further plenary session led by a senior civil service leader.

09:00 – 09:30 (GMT)

Welcome Address

Chair and Headline Knowledge Partner welcome address

09:30 – 10:20 (GMT)

Panel Discussion: The Connected Citizen

Around the world, people are connected like never before. Citizens can build communities, share ideas and shift opinion using a device they keep in their pockets.

In this connected world, citizens expect a meaningful say in how their lives are governed. The tools of the connected world enable them to articulate problems directly and work together to help develop solutions; to take part in global conversations and join global campaigns for change.

Do you know these connected citizens? Which of them will be empowered by connectivity, and who risks getting left behind? What will they need and expect from government? How can government change in order to meet these demands?

EY is plugging in to connected citizens so we can help you find some answers.

Using global public attitudes survey analysis, this panel session will seek to deepen our understanding of citizens – their needs, values and behaviours – both today and in the future.

Together we’ll examine how citizens’ lives are changing in the connected world and what this means for the governments that serve them.

Panel
  • George Atalla, EY Global Government & Infrastructure Leader
  • Arnauld Bertrand, EY Global GPS Consulting Leader
  • Julie McQueen, EY Government & Public Sector Lead Analyst
  • Kelly Beaver, Managing Director, Public Affairs Business, Ipsos MORI, United Kingdom

10:20 – 10:50 (GMT)

Coffee Break

10:50 – 11:40 (GMT)

Panel Discussion: Skills and Tools

Whilst innovation requires the right aptitudes and attitudes, it is also a learned skill. Civil servants need an understanding of how to develop, promote and deliver innovative ideas, plus a good knowledge of some of the key fields – such as digital technologies and staff engagement. And tools are equally important, particularly in supporting collaboration and ensuring that good ideas are picked up and adopted. This session will consider the recruitment, training, promotion and performance management policies that best promote innovation in government, and the equipment and systems required to pursue innovative ideas.

Panel
  • Fiona Deans, Director General, Government Digital Service, United Kingdom (chair of Workshop 2)
  • Hala Audi, Director of Strategy, Performance & Assurance, Infrastructure and Projects Authority, United Kingdom (chair of Workshop 10)
  • Lee May Gee, Director, Public Sector Transformation Cluster, Public Service Division, Prime Minister’s Office, Singapore (chair of Workshop 14)
  • Raj Thuppal, Chief Technology Officer, Shared Services Canada, Canada (chair of Workshop 16)

10:50 – 11.50 (GMT)

Breakout Session – Tackling fraud: can automation work?

Our interactive workshop will explore how to tackle fraud and economic crime at an international level through data sharing and automation of due diligence.
We will focus on grants - an important policy instrument for governments worldwide. In the UK alone they have an annual value of about £113bn - this represents around 13% of total annual UK government expenditure. However, they are neither consistently awarded nor retrospectively assessed with the rigour expected in other areas of government spending. There is a need to drive improvements to address risk and achieve large-scale efficiencies and value for money.
Ivana Gordon will introduce the transformation work embarked by the UK Government Grants Management Function. They will highlight ongoing work to enhance their automated ‘applicant risking tool’, known as Spotlight. This has been identified as one of the top four UK government projects that may catalyse AI adoption in the public sector. They will also look at the automation of due diligence in procurement.
The session will also focus on international aspects: how to enable due diligence at an international level so that governments can confidently partner with businesses based outside their own countries.

Panel
  • Ivana Gordon, Head of Grants Transformation Programme, Cabinet Office, United Kingdom
  • Emma Dwyer, Senior Manager, Financial Crime & Forensics Technology and Data Consulting, EY
  • Juha Kuusala, National VAT Anti Fraud coordinator, Corporate Taxation Unit, Finnish Tax Administration, Finland
  • Euan Slack, Head of Spotlight, Grants Management Function, Cabinet Office

11:40 to 12:30 (GMT)

Panel Discussion: Data Management and Sharing

Good data management and sharing is key to many innovative projects – permitting cross-departmental services built around user needs, for example, and enabling evidence-based policymaking and service delivery. The challenges here are partly technical and organisational, but many countries also face barriers around legislation and public perceptions. As well as considering the systems, protocols and regulatory structures required to support secure, effective use of data across government, this panel discussion will examine different approaches to winning public trust.

Panel
  • Shahar Bracha, Acting CEO Government ICT Authority, The National Digital Ministry, Israel (chair of Workshop 4)
  • Eileen Fuchs, Principle and Head of Division; Digital policy, Federal Ministry of the Interior, Germany (chair of Workshop 5)
  • Mireille Laroche, Assistant Commissioner, Service, Innovation and Integration Branch, Chief Data Officer, and Chief Service Officer, Canada (chair of Workshop 6)
  • Julie Pierce, Director of Openness, Data and Digital and Director for Wales, Food Standards Agency, United Kingdom (chair of Workshop 17)
  • Sue Bateman, Deputy Director, Data and Innovation, Government Digital Service, United Kingdom

12:30 to 13:30 (GMT)

Lunch and Networking

13:30 – 14:20 (GMT)

Panel Discussion: Commissioning and Deploying New Technologies

New and emerging digital technologies have huge potential to support innovative practices and services. But developing, commissioning and deploying them demands a specific set of skills, along with reformed planning, funding, procurement and management systems. Emerging technologies such as AI bring new challenges around bias, ethics and accountability – and on the horizon loom new generations of tech, such as quantum computing. This session will discuss how civil services can adapt their approach to suit the strengths, demands and risks of digital technologies, and consider how technologies are likely to evolve in the years to come.
Panel
  • Stefan Schlosser, Policy Advisor, Federal Chancellery, Division Digital State, Germany (chair of Workshop 3)
  • Hans-Jörg Schäper, Deputy Director General, Directorate General VI - Information Technology, Federal Ministry of Finance, Germany (chair of Workshop 7)
  • Melinda Johnson, Commercial Director, Department of Health and Social Care, United Kingdom (chair of Workshop 12)
  • Chris Ferguson, Director, Government Digital Service, United Kingdom (chair of Workshop 18)
  • Mark Palmer, Head of Public Sector, EMEA, Google Cloud

14:20 – 15:10 (GMT)

Panel Discussion: Programme Governance and Finance

Most countries’ systems of accountability, funding and management run vertically down departmental structures – but many civil service innovations demand collaborative, cross-departmental action and programmes. This poses a challenge to traditional approaches to project governance, demanding shared structures that retain clear lines of accountability whilst permitting joint decision-making. And many innovative and digital projects are best developed through iterative ‘Agile’ methods, which can clash with established systems for project approval, business planning and budgeting. This session will consider how programme approval, management and governance processes can best be adapted to support innovation across government.

Panel
  • Paul O'Neil, Deputy Chief Executive of Operations and General Counsel, Serious Fraud Office, New Zealand (chair of Workshop 8)
  • Vesa Lipponen, Chief Information Officer, Ministry of Finance, Finland (chair of Workshop 9)
  • Matthew Rees, Director of Regulation and Economics, Single Source Regulations Office, UK (chair of Workshop 13)
  • Kevin Cunnington, Director General of International Government Service, United Kingdom (chair of Workshop 19)

    15:10 – 15:40 (GMT)

    Coffee Break

    15:40 – 16:30 (GMT)

    Panel Discussion: Leading Innovation

    Above all, civil service innovation demands a supportive environment – and that must come down from the top. Civil servants need to be confident that their ideas will be taken seriously; that innovative projects will receive high-level backing; and that they can experiment and take well-judged risks without damaging their careers. So civil service leaders need to model the right behaviours, champion innovative practice, and clear the path for promising projects. This session will consider how civil services can support and promote innovation in leadership – both amongst today’s senior managers, and in developing the next generation.

    Panel
    • Oliver Jones, EY-Parthenon Global Government and Public Sector Strategy Leader; Partner, Geostrategic Business Group (chair of Workshop 1)
    • Seong Ju Park, Deputy Director of the Digital Government Cooperation Division, Republic of Korea (chair of Workshop 11)
    • Magnus Enzell, Senior Advisor, Department for Digital Government, Ministry of Infrastructure, Sweden (chair of Workshop 15)
    • Susan Acland-Hood, Acting Permanent Secretary, Department for Education, United Kingdom (chair of Workshop 20)

    15:40 – 17:10 (GMT)

    Breakout Session – Risk management & Supply Chain: Can you spot your next big threat before it reveals itself?

    For all organizations – including governments – supply chain risks are getting larger and moving quicker. Whether you’re building new infrastructure, commissioning defense contracts, or using partners to provide vital public services, quality and value for taxpayers can be threatened by weaknesses in your supply chain. In this interactive session, you can explore how new technology can be applied to help you see these risks, enabling you to take decisive action to protect vital public services and projects. You can also see a preview of EY’s new Business relationship and economic threat analysis (BRETA) tool.

    Panel
    • John Burns, Global BRETA Solutions Leader & US Strategy & Transactions Leader, Government & Public Sector
    • Kris Naleszkiewicz, EY BRETA Development and Operations Leader

    16:30 – 16:45 (GMT)

    Closing Remarks

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